Days 21 and 22 Tundra….My Darling, I’m back!


Oh the Joy, the decadence, the gluttonous feeding of the ego to have the world to oneself…..

 

 


Mine Mine Mine


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 ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way


 

Very old caribou antler

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Looking down the ridge that we’re following

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This area is called Eastern Beringia and From the Richardson mountains to the east, south to the coastal mountains, west to the Bering Sea and North to the Arctic Ocean (or more specifically the Beaufort Sea).

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We followed the ridge from the bottom right corner up to the left and then over and beyond the furthest bump in the distance.  These ridges are part of the continental divide (dividing the Beaufort Sea watershed from the Bering Sea watershed).  These mountains are the most northerly extent in of the North American Rocky Mountains.  To be honest I’m still a little confused about the geography of this region.  The mountain shapes and the rocky outcrops and moraine were formed by both glaciation and the upheaval caused when the continental divide was formed.  I was always under the impression that moraine was caused by glaciers but some of what I read says that these moraines were actually caused by the grinding by think ice sheets rather than glaciers.  In any case, you can see the mounds of rocks in the video above.

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Here you can easily see the up-lift

From, “The Dempster Highway Travelogue”:

 The Richardson Mountains are composed of dark shale and sandstone deposited

in a deep basin about 450 million years ago. The mountains form a narrow

line between north-trending faults. East-directed tectonic forces caused the

sedimentary rocks to buckle and uplift between these faults; a mountain range

formed during the last 50 million years. They are unique because, during the

last ice age, the climate here was too dry for glacial formation. The tip of the

Laurentide Ice Sheet was stopped by this mountain range, marking the eastern

edge of the unglaciated area.

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At the end of this video we are looking back toward the campsite where we began two days of hikes.  You can see the white spec of the camper.

  

ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way


Moss trying to trick me!  I’m seeing antlers in everything now!  I’m obsessed….

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Antler Moss

Maybe this is a prehistoric mammoth skull!

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I think this is weather worn quartz. It was a chunk about two feet in diameter. There were smaller smooth pieces near by.

 


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The scratchy sound you hear in the background are ground squirrels.  The girls had a very good time looking for them but never came close to finding one.  The bears also like to hunt for ground squirrels.  Here’s are area where one has been digging after them

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Some plant life

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Cloud Berries

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They’re edible but I thought they tasted a bit bland and they were kind of creamy… which I didn’t like

I don’t know if the NWT locals do this but the Alaskans make ‘Eskimo Ice Cream’ out of berries. It’s made of Crisco, berries, sugar, and a “texturizer”, either boiled white fish or mashed potatoes.


 ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way

 You can see the crazy weather changing by the second.  But the Poodles don’t care… neither do I.

The dogs are looking a bit disheveled by now.  So do I, that’s why you never see pictures of me.  ha ha ha

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Eureka’s Lyle Lovett impression

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ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way ΓainΓainGo∀way


 

Let’s play find the poodle again…..

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Nickel says More More


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But off we go to find our last night’s stay on the Dempster Highway……

3 thoughts on “Days 21 and 22 Tundra….My Darling, I’m back!

  1. Too bad those poodle girls are having such a HORRIBLE time! LOL Amazing and lovely country – makes me want to pack up. While I have no desires to go to S.A. I will one day get to Alaska and much more of Canada! 🙂

    Like

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